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Castle Hill, from another perspective

Castle Hill

My sister, Clare, and Zach are both really good rock climbers. I like climbing, but I can’t say I’ve been bitten by the bug. Mostly because climbing scares me and is a frustrating activity. But what I didn’t realize until the past few weeks is how much climbing suits me. It is a good physical and mental exercise and attracts awesome, like minded people.

We spent the past week and a half at Castle Hill, a bouldering site en route to Arthur’s Pass on the South Island. Our initial plan was to stay for a few days, then head to another destination. But we found that Castle Hill provided us endless climbing projects and new friends from all over the world, so why leave?

Going into this trip, I was a little nervous. I hadn’t climbed much since last spring and wasn’t all that excited to be bad at something. I hate that part of cross training. The part where no matter how fit you are, when you switch sports, you start again at square one. My reaction to the rocks on the first day was: There are no hand holds. There are no feet holds. This is impossible. F this sport. I’m out. Most of my experience has been at Brooklyn Boulders, our beloved climbing gym in NYC, so here I was getting used to climbing outdoors and also climbing here at Castle Hill, which is itself unique and very technical. In a nutshell, day one was frustrating.

But we had found some other climbers from the US, from France, from Israel and Italy, and they had all been at Castle Hill for awhile. And they all remembered their first few days. They were great at reminding me that there is a learning curve here and to be patient with myself. A group of about eight of us climbed together for a few days, all of us climbing problems on different levels of difficulty. The beauty in that is that you get to spend quite a bit of time hanging out, spotting other climbers, and staring at the mountains between climbs. You get to see how other people approach bouldering problems and react to not being able to finish a problem. I was able to get out of my own head and shake off some of the “I can’t do this” by hanging out with other climbers.

Regardless of where they are from, climbers tend to be laid back, friendly, supportive people. They tend to be people I like. By the end of the first week, I was climbing problems that I couldn’t do at the beginning, I was trusting myself and I was able to pass on some words of encouragement to people who had just arrived.

I can’t wait to go back :) Mom and Dad are sending me new climbing shoes and we have rerouted our travels so that we cross through Arthur’s Pass a few times in the next few months. Like anything, it is more fun with practice and cool people.

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